Travel Back In Time at the Hay Creek Festival

News photo by Joshua Smith John Warren of Gilbertsville putting together a corn broom in front of visitors at the Hay Creek Festival.

Joanna Furnace in Morgantown Pennsylvania held their annual Hay Creek Festival this past weekend.

The Hay Creek Festival is a time to remember the past. There are many different activities that visitors can partake in to see how things were done before modern machinery was invented. The Hay Creek Festival also has people who hold shows to teach visitors about the past.

The first thing that you encounter when you enter Hay Creek Fest is a large group of antique cars. The cars range from the 1920s to the 1960s. All of the cars have to be all original before they are allowed to be in the festival. Also with the vehicles were antique engines and tractors.

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Visitors were also able to look at the original Joanna Furnace. There were shows that let visitors learn how the furnace worked back when it was still in service.

An arts and crafts area was also available to visitors, where you could talk to people at the stands about how the arts and crafts were made. These stands included broom making, cooking, glass blowing, and wood carving. Many stands sold some of the crafts that they had created.

All of the people at the stands wore clothing that was authentic to the period. There was a stand for visitors to dress up in some of the clothes of the period. That stand was run by Sylvia Deye, a member of service unit 776 from Twin Valley. Most of the visitors to the stand were little girls. “The girls love to dress up,”Deye said.

Guests seemed to enjoy all different parts of the festival. “I would have to say that my favorite part was the wood working area” said David Smith of Oley, Pa. Smith also said that he would “absolutely” come back to the festival another year.

This is not the only festival that Joanna Furnace throws throughout the year. Just like the Hay Creek Festival, all of the festivals at Joanna Furnace are designed to teach visitors about the past.