Local karate teacher releases novel

“Prometheus: The George Dillman Story”By George A. Dillman, with his studentsis the first and only biography—authorized or otherwise—ofGrandmaster 10th-Degree Black Belt, George A. Dillman . . . irrefutablyone of the pioneers of the Eastern martial arts in post-World War IIAmerica. For anyone with an interest in the evolution of these arts inthe West, Dillman’s experience provides a veritable Who’s Who of thoseexciting times.The author is acknowledged as perhaps the foremost authority onPressure Point Theory applied to the martial arts in the U.S. Prometheusdetails the kind of hard science that Dillman engaged and sponsored(cadaver studies, EKG studies, electrical and neurological monitoring,thermal imaging) of Eastern Pressure Point Theory. Three medical doctorsand a SWAT officer—among his highest rankingstudents—add their expertiseto this book with reportsof their investigationsof Dillman’s methods.Having trained underthe likes of Harry Smith, Danny Paiand Hohan Soken, Dillman was oneof the most-awarded competitors on the tournament circuit in the 1960sand ‘70s, and received advanced instructor certifications in a wide variety

of martial arts. Dillman was always dedicated to sharing the work’s benefitsfor both health and self-defense. During the 1980s and ‘90s, for example, hepartnered with other great Headmasters—Wally Jay (Small Circle Jujitsu),Remy Presas (Modern Arnis) and Leo Fong (Wei Kuen Do)—to give seminarsall over the world.With testimonies from 50 of his peers and students (now teachers), the book is a record of his contributions to others,both personal and professional. As much of the narrative is offered in Dillman’s own words, the reader meets the manhimself—his unvarnished prose, his quirky interactions with animals (even cougars and bears!), his irrepressible sense ofhumor, and his sheer determination in pushing limits in whatever he undertook.George is now the CEO of Dillman Karate International, a global organization with hundreds of affiliated schoolsand tens of thousands of students.

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