In Other News

BOOK BEAT - IMPACT: A Tree Grows in Brooklyn

By Jeff Hall Columnist |

Welcome to my World: Cake walks, now and then

Several years ago, my sister, Gladys, and I attended our home church, Maxatawny Union, for their annual June Strawberry and Ice Cream Festival. One of the events that day was the cake walk, with both adults and youngsters joining in on the fun. It bro...

By Carole Christman Koch Columnist |

MOST RECENT STORIES

  • Columns

    The Historian - A trip down the Rhine: Part III, The Crossing

    Until well into the 20th century, German dialect was the everyday language of most everyone in New Hanover and the surrounding townships. The New Hanover region was settled in the early 18th century (which is the 1700s) by Germanic immigrants from areas around the upper watershed of the Rhine River. Thousands risked everything, even their lives in perilous sea voyages, to find refuge in Penn’s “Holy Experiment.” They were drawn here by the promise of relief from...

    By Robert Wood Columnist |

  • Columns

    Welcome to my World: The many forms of love

    Whatever form of love is given to a spouse, family, friends or strangers, including animals, it is one of our greatest gifts from the heart that we can give to others. It is our natural state of being. As Mother Teresa tell us, “None of us can do anything great on our own, but we can do a small thing with great love.”

    By Carole Christman Koch Columnist |

  • Columns

    A Look Back in History - To the port of Philadelphia by way of six-horse Conestoga wagon teams: Part II

    In 1791, Alexander Hamilton’s Federal excise tax on whiskey caused the Whiskey Rebellion among Scotch-Irish farmers in Western Pennsylvania. George Washington, as President, took charge of having Federal troops to put down this misunderstood ethnic tax Rebellion, which these Scotch-Irish natives thought was only against them. It was at this time, while traveling through the lower end of the Oley Valley en route to Western Pennsylvania, that he and Rev. Henry Muhlenberg stopped off to...

    By Richard L.T. Orth Columnist |

  • Columns

    As I See It: Prayer flunks out at graduation

    At a recent school district board meeting in Pottsgrove, I observed a spirit of confusion regarding the rights of free speech. The debate centered on the need for the school board to maintain neutrality in matters of religion, while at the same time, preserving the rights of individual students to religious speech. In light of someone taking offense at a prayer at last year’s graduation ceremony, there is now a proposed ban on prayer in all future graduation ceremonies in...

    By Mary Cantell Columnist |

  • Columns

    PERSON TO PERSON - IMPACT: Touching the heart

    Have you ever met someone you wish you were more like? No, I’m not talking about a young boy who wishes to be a great baseball player like Mike Trout, of the Los Angeles Angels, or a girl who swoons over the latest male movie star or boy band. Nor am I talking about a middle aged person who covets the wealth and possessions of a Fortune 500 Chief Executive Officer.

    By Jeff Hall Columnist |

  • Columns

    The Historian - A trip down the Rhine: Part II

    Most emigrants were well aware of the difficulties and dangers of crossing the Atlantic to Philadelphia in the 18th century. The early refuges literally took their lives in hand when they boarded an English ship for the two, three or even four month crossing. Pirates, storms and shipwreck were no idle threats, but most who perished lost their lives to starvation, rations of spoiled food or disease from water barrels filled at polluted wells.

    By Robert Wood Columnist |

  • Columns

    Welcome to my World: The art of auctioneering

    One of the things I enjoyed as a youngster, in the 40s and early 50s, was attending auctions, at a local home or farm sale, with Mom and Pop. Mostly, I was mesmerized by the actions of the auctioneer himself, Luther Welder. I was impressed by his style of counting and oftentimes didn’t even grasp what he said, due to such fast talking. I’d laugh at the funny things he’d say to the bidders about an item. In the end, when the bidding was over, I’d hear,...

    By Carole Christman Koch Columnist |

  • Columns

    A Look Back in History: To the port of Philadelphia by way of six-horse Conestoga wagon teams

    Historians record that there were literally a thousand Conestoga wagons from upstate Pennsylvania on their way to sell their valuable harvest to ship captains for hard cash. On almost any road leading to Philadelphia were these Red, White and Blue Conestoga wagons with beautiful homespun white covers protecting their yearly harvest and pulled by six-horse teams of Conestoga horses embellished with Conestoga bells that announced their presence on the highway. But, as teamsters returned home...

    By Richard L.T. Orth Columnist |

  • Columns

    BOOK BEAT - IMPACT: The Excellent Lombards by Jane Hamilton

    The Excellent Lombards, by Jane Hamilton, is the 16th book I have reviewed for “Book Beat – Impact” and it is the hardest one to write about because I wasn’t particularly impressed with it. Like most authors who have previously made the New York Times Best Seller List, the cover indicates a book written by Jane Hamilton in 1994, entitled A Map of the World, made the New York Times Best Seller List.

    By Jeff Hall Columnist |

  • Columns

    The Historian: A 1720 trip down the Rhine

    On Aug. 30, 1720 the ship Laurel, John Coppel, Master, from Liverpool and Cork, docked in Philadelphia with about 240 Palatine immigrants. It is believed that aboard that ship were New Hanover pioneers Henry Antes, his father and sister, as well as John Philip Boehm, school master, who founded and led the Falkner Swamp Reformed congregation, among others. It is helpful to remember that in those days the job of “school master” was not similar to our school teacher, but more...

    By Robert Wood Columnist |

The Berks-Mont News: BLOGS