Spring into STEM: Exeter Township School District hosts night of learning fun for students, parents, community

Hayden Ginsberg, 11, of Exeter’s Reiffton School, tries to determine if a Non-Newton Fluid is a solid or a liquid.
Hayden Ginsberg, 11, of Exeter’s Reiffton School, tries to determine if a Non-Newton Fluid is a solid or a liquid. Jesi Yost - Digital First Media
Students control mBot robots with computers.
Students control mBot robots with computers. Jesi Yost - Digital First Media

Spring Into STEM was a fantastic night of learning and fun for Exeter Township School District students, parents, and community members on April 26 at Reiffton School from 6 to 8 p.m.

Riggs Williams, 5, took a Puzzle/Cube Challenge. With a total of 8 possible way to assemble them, this 7th grade STEM project challenges students to take 4 Linking Cubes and construct them into different designs.

Girls Who Code members, Emily Holleran and Alexa Hyman, all 8th graders, used ice cream to complete a circuit allowing notes to play on a computer keyboard. The energy travels from Holleran, to the ice cream, from the ice cream to the Makey Makey wires connected to the computer.

Fourth grader, Elijah Barsoum, 9, of Exeter Township, pointed out a square he created that was added to a Leonardo da Vinci mural. The piece was produced with squares drawn and colored by various students and adults. Combining Math and Art, Reiffton School’s Art Specialist, Tim Dewalt constructed a grid on a Leonardo da Vinci portrait. Visitors to the Spring into STEM event were invited to replicate a square from the grid. The squares were then combined to form a large mural.

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10th grade AP Bio students with their teacher Amber Bollinger demonstrated Biology Basics.

Exeter Township sophomores Reid Martin, Ryu Morgan, Nicholas Ciabattoni, and Colin Pinkerton brought their VEX Robot to show to attendees.

Hayden Ginsberg, 11, of Exeter’s Reiffton School, tried to determine if a Non-Newton Fluid is a solid or a liquid. Comprised of 1 pint of water to 1 pound of corn starch this Non-Newton Fluid is a liquid in its natural state, but turns to a solid when force is applied.

There was also the STEM Maker Station with a potato powered clock and students could launch a water rocket and control mBot robots with computers, to name a few of the STEM activities and demonstrations that night.