In Other News

The Historian: ‘Hit and miss’ engines were a hit with farmers

By Robert Wood Columnist|

PASSHE Op-Ed: State System strategic review key to Kutztown University’s future

As a member of Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education, Kutztown University of Pennsylvania is part of the strategic review being undertaken by the State System—a top-to-bottom examination of the operations of all 14 System unive...

By Cynthia D. Shapira, Board of Governors Chair and Frank T. Brogan, Chancellor PASSHE|

MOST RECENT STORIES

  • Opinion

    The Historian: Clothing the family

    During the 18th and first half of the 19th centuries, clothing the family as well as providing fabric for such things as bed sheets, ticking, pillow cases, hand towels and table cloths was, as we would say, “labor intensive,” and no small undertaking to the already burdened farm wife.

    By Robert Wood Columnist|

  • Opinion

    Welcome to my world: Sally, the Pianist

    Just recently, Sally Anderson, joined our breakfast group. Sally told us, “I lived in California for 28 years and moved back to Pennsylvania in 2015, because I wanted to be closer to my daughter and five grandchildren. Another daughter moved with me and lives in the house too. Yet another daughter is still in California.”

    By Carole Christman Koch|

  • Opinion

    Reflections: Bread may be good for the soul but not the body -- depending on the ingredients

    When Jesus Christ taught us the Our Father, one of the signature lines in the prayer was: “Give us this day our daily bread.”

    By Mike Zielinski Columnist|

  • Opinion

    A LOOK BACK AT HISTORY : Hex signs theory dispelled in a pinch (since 1950s)

    Dr. Alfred L. Shoemaker, celebrated authority on Pennsylvania Dutch hex signs, noted these (hex signs) folk art symbols were found locally on Christian made fraktur birth and baptismal certificates (Taufscheins). Dr. Don Yoder cited tombstones as an area hex signs could also be found on. Itinerant traveling folk artists spread hex-sign design motifs in Berks, Lehigh, and Montgomery Counties, where they lettered and embellished birth certificates for illiterate farm families who wished to...

    By Richard L.T. Orth|

  • Columns

    A look back at history: An amazing creativity in folk art developed in the New World

    Here in the New World in a land of plenty, pioneer immigrants had the resources to develop an American style of folk art never dreamed about in the Old Country, hence the creativity of these Rhinelanders blossomed into an amazing folk art form that was nurtured by freedom of religion and free private enterprise, thus becoming American Folk Art! Although the Plain Dutch, such as the Amish and Old Order Mennonites, seldom engaged in bold colorful folk art as seen by the Church PA Dutch, both...

    By Richard L.T. Orth american-folklife-institute.org|

  • Opinion

    Klees’ Award Winning Book is The Bible on the Pennsylvania Dutch

    In 1950, Fredric Klees had published his award winning book, The Pennsylvania Dutch , which covered the entire Dutch Country with architectural sketches to illustrate his chapters, similar to Alliene DeChant’s style (covered previously), which no doubt influenced her. Born in Reading, PA, Klees taught in the winter months and spent his summers visiting all parts of the Dutch Country to work on his articulate and definitive book. Dr. Alfred Shoemaker, the leading authority on the...

    By Richard L.T. Orth|

  • Opinion

    Letter to the Editor: School Property Tax Elimination Bill raises concerns

    Senate Bill 76 – The School Property Tax Elimination Bill, may be introduced as soon as this week. State Senator David Argall, the sponsor of the legislation, has stated that his goal is to have the law passed and implemented as early as July 1.

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  • Columnists

    Reflections: Waiting for a cancer cure is like waiting for Godot

    We have been waiting for a cure for cancer for what seems an eternity.

    By Mike Zielinski Columnist|

  • Columns

    Carole Christman Koch: President’s Inauguration firsts, traditions, and more: Part 2

    Part 2 Franklin Pierce, in 1853, accepted his presidency, but was still in mourning. Just a few months prior to the ceremony, the Pierces lost their 3rd and last child in a railroad accident, that both witnessed. He refrained from swearing his oath on a Bible, due to his religious beliefs. He was the first to affirm his oath and not swear. His 3,319 word speech was entirely from memory.

    By Carole Christman Koch|

  • Opinion

    PERSON TO PERSON – IMPACT: Tension

    Sometimes, the simplest things in life create tension in you. A few days after Christmas I took our car to be serviced at a dealership. On the way, I passed close to the store that sells my favorite donuts. I know I should not have been thinking of this between Christmas and New Year’s when most of us have overeaten or anticipate doing so, but I thought if I could “get away” with a bill of less than $100 for the car, I would stop at the store on the way home for some...

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