In Other News

ARTHUR GARRISON: Is Donald Trump the next Barry Goldwater?

By Arthur Garrison Columnist|

A Look Back in History: The Americanism ‘Pennsylvania Dutch’ still preferred today

Since Colonial times our ancestors were referred to as the Americanism, “PA Dutch,” a term widely used to describe these immigrants by suburban Philadelphians, who followed the local Quaker-American colloquialism, as people today. This ...

By Richard L.T. Orth|

MOST RECENT STORIES

  • Opinion

    A Look Back in History: Born out of religious freedom, unique Quaker-English Rhineland German ethnic mix

    There is no doubt that the ethnic merger of Quaker English citizens with Rhineland Farmers in Pennsylvania was an ethnic mix that was significant in founding the United States. When the British attacked Philadelphia in 1777, it was PA Dutch farmers of Lehigh County who secretly hid the nation’s Liberty Bell by taking it to Allentown and hid it under one of its churches’ foundations. Although there are still a few isolated PA Dutch dialect-speaking Plain People still following...

    By Richard L.T. Orth Columnist |

  • Opinion

    The great Northwest Passage trip — mountain time

    June 26 — 11:30 a.m. After driving east from Olympic National Park for 2.5 hours and bouncing along a dirt road for the final 25 miles, we were nearing our destination that day — Mt. Rainier. Approaching the final 3 miles, we see the road is blocked by a park ranger sitting in his truck, eating his lunch and guarding a barricade. Not what we wanted to see. I walked up to ask him about the road ahead, and he paused for a minute and said, “Nope, the...

    By Rich Wood |

  • Opinion

    The Historian: The peacock in his pride

    Although not as common as the tulip, heart and distelfink, the image of the flamboyant peacock is commonly found in Pennsylvania Dutch folk culture.

    By Robert Wood |

  • Columns

    A Look Back in History - PA Dutch folk art images & scriveners in the New World: Part II

    In trying to understand the American folk art of our 17th and 18th century Pennsylvania Dutch immigrants to the New World, one must understand the premise of how much of a religious backlash these Pilgrims were a product of during Medieval times including beheading when scribes of the Middle Ages eliminated religious texts and a stylish lettering form known as this Fraktur, among religious persecution.

    By Richard L.T. Orth Columnist |

  • Columns

    Welcome to my World: Memories of Mom’s apron

    Aprons were a very necessary part of Mom’s wardrobe as a farmer’s wife. She had to be careful not to soil the few nice clothes she had. So protecting her dresses from stains and splashes was a priority (Mom never wore slacks - she considered them sinful).

    By Carole Christman Koch Columnist |

  • News

    BOOK BEAT - IMPACT: The Long Goodbye

    The last book I reviewed came from a list provided in the Parade Magazine from the Philadelphia Inquirer listing the best books of the 1940s. Today’s review, The Long Goodbye by Raymond Chandler, is from the same source but was voted one of the 1950s best books. I’m glad I have some stick-to-itiveness because once again this book started what I would consider slowly. However, it finally picked up speed and went from my rating of two stars to four stars (out of five).

    By Jeff Hall Columnist |

  • News

    The Historian - Old inns and taverns of Swamp, Part II: Swamp Hotel

    In this area, taverns were a necessity of village life for more than 200 years. First, taverns were friendly meeting places where men, isolated on the farm, could meet, exchange gossip, learn the news and as we say today “bond.” Taverns were by law not used as post offices, but were meeting houses for political parties, polling places, an overnight rest and shelter for farmers taking their goods to the city, and for drovers taking herds to city markets. Also, taverns were...

    By Robert Wood Columnist |

  • Columns

    Out & About: The Great Northwest Passage Trip - Olympic Gold

    We recently visited the Olympics. No, we were not in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil, but discovered another “Olympics” in northwestern Washington State. Our travels brought us to Olympic National Park, a vast wilderness of almost a million acres. It hosts so much natural beauty and diverse ecosystems; it was named both a World Heritage Site and International Biosphere Reserve by the United Nations.

    By Rich Wood Columnist |

  • Columns

    A Look Back in History: PA Dutch folk art images & scriveners in the New World

    In studying early American folk art, there is no shortage of folk art documents that express early pioneer immigrants’ gratitude for reaching America in a time when many individuals still feared the world was flat, or worse, that sea serpents lurked in the troubled ocean currents enduring their lives. Crossing the vast Atlantic Ocean at the mercy of the sea captain’s nautical skill in the wake of unexpected storms, thousands of Europeans expressed their faith in God and...

    By Richard L.T. Orth Columnist |

  • Columns

    Welcome to my World: Hats galore!

    In the early 1940s, like most children, I enjoyed dressing up in Mom’s dresses and the few hats she owned. At 70, I’m still enamored with hats, whether it’s today’s fashionable ones or the vintage kind.

    By Carole Christman Koch Columnist |

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