In Other News

Carole Christman Koch: President’s Inauguration firsts, traditions, and more: Part 2

By Carole Christman Koch|

PERSON TO PERSON – IMPACT: Tension

Sometimes, the simplest things in life create tension in you. A few days after Christmas I took our car to be serviced at a dealership. On the way, I passed close to the store that sells my favorite donuts. I know I should not have been thinking of...

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MOST RECENT STORIES

  • Opinion

    Look Back at History: Old tin-stamped cookies at Christmastime a Pennsylvania Dutch Tradition & treat

    Hormon Foose, a creative tinsmith from Fleetwood, was one of those craftsmen that demonstrated his artistic abilities at the Kutztown Folk Festival and made tin cut-out cookie cutters which were collected by many families. In 1973, Foose was invited to demonstrate at the National Craft Festival at Silver Dollar City, Missouri in the heart of America’s Ozarks with other celebrated craftsmen, a well-deserved Americana honor. But PA Deitsch antique cookie cutters are rare today,...

    By Richard L.T. Orth|

  • Opinion

    person to person — impact: There’s no business like snow business!

    No, there is no mistake in the title of this column. I slightly modified the 1954 movie musical “There’s No Business Like Show Business”. During this Christmas season when many (especially the kids) have the song “I’m Dreaming of a White Christmas” on their minds, I thought I would take this column to prepare for Christmas and in doing so also talk about Christmas, snow, and the above Irving Berlin musical, staring: Ethel Merman, Marilyn Monroe,...

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  • Opinion

    Think about it: Moving from One Season to Another

    “Isn’t it funny how day by day nothing changes but when you look back everything is different.” — C.S. Lewis

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  • Columns

    A Look Back in History: American history records the Pennsylvania Dutch

    Historians trace this Rhineland immigration to as early as 1683, when the first waves of Rhenish immigrants speaking the Germanic Dialect arrived in Pennsylvania. One Historian, R. Webster records: “Although the immigrants that made up the 1683 Germantown settlement in the city of Philadelphia were German-speaking Dutch, German, and Swiss immigrants, most of them were Dutch.” Germantown was the Colonial printing center for German language Bibles and religious imprints for...

    By Richard L.T. Orth|

  • Columns

    The Historian: The story of ‘black head’ bricks

    If you examine local brickwork of the 18th and 19th centuries you will see a small number of bricks that have black ends, apparently glazed. This black glazing is not intentional. The “black-heads” were those bricks directly exposed to the kiln fires. Called black-end or black-head bricks they were usually considered seconds and were often placed away from the street side of houses or hidden under pent eaves or such or used on utility buildings like smoke houses. Sometimes in...

    By Robert Wood Columnist|

  • Opinion

    Mike Zielinski— The magic of Christmas season

    I don’t know whether anyone can quantify it or thoroughly explain it even after delving into the depths of theology and sociology, but the Christmas season has a magical quality — spiritual and secular — like no other time of the year.

    By Mike Zielinski Guest columnist|

  • Columns

    A Look Back in History — To Allemangel and Westward: Travels by a PA Dutch Conestoga Wagon …

    By the mid-1700’s, when immigrant Colonial wagon trains passed through the beautiful Oley Valley and East Penn region from Philadelphia en route to frontier lands northeast of Kempton (upper part of county), the Germans called this new territory “Allemangel,” meaning all wants, for its lack of fertility and farmable land. A rugged terrain, that was eventually tamed, the land did not match the rich Oley Valley bottomlands or its rate of productivity. The Pennsylvania...

    By Richard L.T. Orth|

  • Opinion

    Letter to the Editor: DEP report does not address many Kutztown Quarry issues

    Dear Editor: I am very disappointed with the response I received from the Department of Environmental Protection regarding the proposed permit revision requested by New Enterprise Stone & Lime Co., Inc. for the Kutztown Quarry. Those of us who submitted comments on the project at the public hearing we requested in August received a 9-page report that lists specific concerns raised and the agency’s recommendations for each one.

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  • Opinion

    person to person — impact: Common, yes, but a treasure still

    It’s amazing how by happenstance you can be taught a lesson! Barb was walking on the sidewalk from our driveway to our front porch. She thought she saw a leaf on the sidewalk and was about to crunch it as she walked, when she focused more closely on the object. It turned out to be the butterfly she caught on her smartphone, above.

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  • Opinion

    A Look Back in History: From Native Clay to Beautiful Roof tile Adorning our Most Primitive Homes

    In the Colonial years, when handmade brick was scarce, the availability of native clay also afforded Valley pioneers to build attractive brick chimneys with courses of brick corbelling. The result: the entire Oley Township being honored as a National Historic District by the United States Department of the Interior, for its heritage. Unlike the quickly fashioned frontier homes built by the Scotch-Irish, these sturdy Germanic homes with their clay-tiled roofs and salmon brick arches built...

    By Richard L.T. Orth|

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