Here we are already wrapped up in a new 2009 economic recession crisis: and they are out to get you. They are the "con artists." Conniving and conspiring to sell anything suckers will buy including investment schemes, medigap health insurance swindles, home improvement and home equity scams.Having been a member of a bank advisory board for a few years, I came in contact with victims of the "home equity scam." In this case, duped senior citizens not only lost big bucks, but in some instances, they lost the homes that they spent a lifetime paying for.

The home equity scam was prevalent back a few years ago. Beware if you are approached by strangers offering to buy your home through complicated real estate deals.

Never, never sign anything the same day offered by a potential buyer of your property. STOP! SCRUTINIZE carefully. It may well be a shady entrepreneur specializing in "fabricated" homes- all built on lies. Check with the Realtors' Association, the Better Business Bureau, or your bank.

To gain your confidence, the con artist will frequently pose as a vicarious representative of a government agency or an association of retired citizens. They are the masters of excessive flattery and skilled at double talk.

About shysters, I thought I'd tackle the fraud and scam topic one more time. If you are by nature an artless, trusting person lacking critical ability, the following might just be of some aid to your purse strings.

Some people become so centered on racking up easy money that they are willing to trust without verifying, while others fall for these scams because they are convinced there is a carefully guarded secret to making the big bucks.

You name it. There are just enough vigorous villains out there with plans to fill the wallet of the easy mark. They are slick and shifty when it comes to the truth.

How about some of these deceptive openers used by phony scam specialists?

"We are doing a survey in your neighborhood. We'll pay you if you don't mind answering a few questions. I'm not trying to sell you anything." Sure.....not!

Telemarketing: It is still going on if you are not on the "Do Not Call list." It should be labeled "tele-defrauding." At any hour, we are exasperated by the phone calls from what has become known as "boiler room" operators.

They specialize in dozens of phony "confidence game" sales pitches to get you to part with your hard earned savings.

There are get rich quick schemes, discount on this, deductions on that free fantastic offers of prizes. There are promotions for every pocketbook.

If you do not choose to hang up on them, request written information. Remember, many a crooked scheme is born on a dubious contract. Check them out. Never send money or give your credit card number to a cold call sales pitch. Don't be gullible. It could be "buy now- pray later."

Slam your door on the con artist going door to door hawking home improvement services such as roofing or paving. Senior citizens are frequent targets of fast talking con men. They will try to convince you that the repairs are absolutely vital.

The really reputable legitimate contractors rarely solicit business by going door to door. If it's the con artist at work, do not be impulsive. If it is a good deal, it can wait 24 hours until you do check it out.

The goal of any confidence swindler is to con you out of your money as quick as possible. He has many tried and true (sic) tactics to grab your cash and run on the same day they contact you.

Remember, the scam is a crime. "Crime doesn't pay" unless you are good at it. They are good at it! They will even go to the convenience of sending a courier to pick up your check or credit card number.

If they ask you to make a sizable withdrawal from your savings account- check with your bank officials- or call the cops.

I've said it before: BUYER BE WHERE? On your guard is where. The quick fix? SLAM the door. HANG UP the phone.

I got to go now. I have to see my broker. He tells me has a foolproof investment that will make me rich. (or poorer?)

E-mail Charlie Adams Jr.: LST281@aol.com.

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