In the past most of my columns have bordered on levity, (I call it Serio-comedic). Here I am about to wax philosophical. Now and then I find the need to get serious, primarily because since my retirement many years ago, much has changed. It's not that we worry about getting older - it's the occasional anguish that we won't.It's the worry, my troubled state of mind, to which I have misgivings. It got me to thinking of how we torment ourselves because we are inclined to commiserate over the many things we cannot resolve or alter. The greatest mistake we can make is to worry that we'll make one.

We must try to set aside the trivial uncertainties. Agonizing about tomorrow will surely diminish today's vigor.

Tomorrow only brings more political bull. It makes you grateful only one candidate can be elected president. When you make your choice, vote for the one who you think "will do the least harm."

I try not to vote "for;" I vote "against."

If you are retired or contemplating early retirement, try to enjoy the so-called Golden Years. If you don't, what are you going to have to be nostalgic about in 2020?

The tide will turn. Never worry when it goes out; it always comes back. I started at the top and now I'm working my way down.

Retirement age doesn't inevitably mean "it's one foot in the grave," however it does necessitate countless adjustments. When little blunders, memory lapses, and sporadic misunderstandings occur, we tend to blame our age. It's just that some of that old "getup-and-go"...did! We're only as old as we feel. Ain't that a damn shame?

It seems some of us stop growing at both ends and at our age start growing down the middle.

I am certainly forgetful at times, and I do worry about that, but then I forget about it. I thought I found a cure - then I forgot that, too.

Let me put it this way: When I was a kid I could remember anything whether it happened or not.

Today that ability doesn't exist. I cannot remember anything but the things that never happened.

It's a sad state going to pieces like that, but we all have to do it.

Sometimes I get to thinking that life is just a matter of luck. If I didn't have some bad luck, I'd have no luck at all.

Talk about luck? It's unfair. All the rich people have all the money. But when you get right down to it, rich people are just poor people with money.

If I persist in being a continual worry wart, I wouldn't be so worried. I pursue one of my hobbies (writing is one of them, plus drawing.). It gives me something to do while I fret and have qualms. Before long I commence to think positive.

Get a hobby. The best thing about a hobby is that it keeps you occupied while you're worrying. They can be fun, especially if your wife doesn't find out. I wish I had as much fun in my pastime diversion as my wife thinks I do.

We all know life is temporary. Life is what we make it, (until somebody makes it worse).

I laugh at myself once in a while. I might as well. Everyone else does.

We shouldn't get too uptight about world problems at our age, we are not young enough to know everything. Even teenagers don't have all the answers.

Consider this: The older you get, the greater you were!

Are you sure? "I'm positive!"

Only a fool is positive! "Are you sure?"

I'm positive! As Napoleon said after drowning his troubles at Waterloo, "Non pas que tracasser." "What, me worry?" (He really did!)

I'll end this bit of non sequitur (not more French?) by borrowing a good old Pennsylvania Dutch admonition. "As you slide down the banister of life, may the splinters point the wrong way!"

I can sympathize with everything except suffering.

Here I want to be the writer that says nothing at the right time.

Email Charlie Adams Jr. at

LST281@AOL.COM.

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