As a young buck in his early college days, the ol' one's diet did lean a bit to the burger and cheese steak side of the food pyramid. But back in those days, there was always enough going on to help burn off any fat build up, a more active metabolism notwithstanding.

Oh, alright. The ol' one admits that he should be a bit more active. Hey! He always manages to park the car in a far corner of a parking lot so that the walk to the store is that much longer. And, he guesses, getting up and down off the porch has to be some form of aerobic exercise.

Back on the intake side of life, Ol' Morgan has been told a salad makes for a good meal in addition to providing needed roughage. In fact, the ol' one makes a highly palatable tuna salad supreme that includes mushrooms, tomatoes, Romaine lettuce, olives, onions, alfalfa sprouts, garbanzo beans, peas, a sprinkle or two of garlic and black pepper, maybe a slice or two of lunch meat neatly sliced and artistically placed in the mix, an anchovy or two (in season), and the piece de resistance, tuna fish (either chunk light or white) drizzled with salad dressing du jour. A meal fit for a king.

Of course, one must set out to the supermarket or stop along the way at a farm stand (in season) to procure most of the fixin's for the salad experience. While anyone can build a salad at one of those salad bars like they have in Martins' Country Market, ol' Morgan prefers the solitude of the kitchen for salad purposes wherein he can also savor a good cup o' joe while practicing his "saladary" prowess.

But over at Martins' you can also pick up a meal at the hot counter by the meat department. The ol' one occasionally does this when he brings to this noble newspaper his weekly exercise in journalistic excellence.

A hot meal is always welcome as far as the ol' one is concerned. But the folks at Martins' ought to take stock of a watery situation over there at the hot counter.

When a person goes to dig in for the peas or the carrots, there is no easy way to drain off the water in which these vegetables have been sitting. Sure serving spoons are provided but that's not enough. If Martins' provided slotted spoons for the vegetables, they would greatly

reduce the risk of excess liquid seeping out of the foam container in which you have placed your hot meal as you carry it over to the check out line or when you get to your car. Might also save on the cleaning bill, too.

Over the wireless came news that a psychologist at the University of Rochester, Kirk Warren Brown, has made an earth-stopping discovery. He has found that workers' moods change for the better as the week wears on. By Friday, workers become nicer and more social to themselves and each other.

Hmmm. Maybe the ol' one should wait until Friday to get that hot meal over at Martins'-at least until they put slotted spoons in at the hot counter.

It's not every day that Ol' Morgan eats out, he being a basic two-slices-of-bread-and-some-lunch-meat-kind of fellow. As a young buck in his early college days, the ol' one's diet did lean a bit to the burger and cheese steak side of the food pyramid. But back in those days, there was always enough going on to help burn off any fat build up, a more active metabolism notwithstanding.

Oh, alright. The ol' one admits that he should be a bit more active. Hey! He always manages to park the car in a far corner of a parking lot so that the walk to the store is that much longer. And, he guesses, getting up and down off the porch has to be some form of aerobic exercise.

Back on the intake side of life, Ol' Morgan has been told a salad makes for a good meal in addition to providing needed roughage. In fact, the ol' one makes a highly palatable tuna salad supreme that includes mushrooms, tomatoes, Romaine lettuce, olives, onions, alfalfa sprouts, garbanzo beans, peas, a sprinkle or two of garlic and black pepper, maybe a slice or two of lunch meat neatly sliced and artistically placed in the mix, an anchovy or two (in season), and the piece de resistance, tuna fish (either chunk light or white) drizzled with salad dressing du jour. A meal fit for a king.

Of course, one must set out to the supermarket or stop along the way at a farm stand (in season) to procure most of the fixin's for the salad experience. While anyone can build a salad at one of those salad bars like they have in Martins' Country Market, ol' Morgan prefers the solitude of the kitchen for salad purposes wherein he can also savor a good cup o' joe while practicing his "saladary" prowess.

But over at Martins' you can also pick up a meal at the hot counter by the meat department. The ol' one occasionally does this when he brings to this noble newspaper his weekly exercise in journalistic excellence.

A hot meal is always welcome as far as the ol' one is concerned. But the folks at Martins' ought to take stock of a watery situation over there at the hot counter.

When a person goes to dig in for the peas or the carrots, there is no easy way to drain off the water in which these vegetables have been sitting. Sure serving spoons are provided but that's not enough. If Martins' provided slotted spoons for the vegetables, they would greatly

reduce the risk of excess liquid seeping out of the foam container in which you have placed your hot meal as you carry it over to the check out line or when you get to your car. Might also save on the cleaning bill, too.

Over the wireless came news that a psychologist at the University of Rochester, Kirk Warren Brown, has made an earth-stopping discovery. He has found that workers' moods change for the better as the week wears on. By Friday, workers become nicer and more social to themselves and each other.

Hmmm. Maybe the ol' one should wait until Friday to get that hot meal over at Martins'-at least until they put slotted spoons in at the hot counter.

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